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7 Simple Methods to Boost Your Job Search After a Break

  • Salman
  • in
  • Back to Work, Career Development
  • |
  • 04 Oct 2018
7-simple-methods-to-boost-your-job-search-after-a-break

 

"Starting over is the opportunity to come back better than before”

 - Ryan Kahn

Wondering how to restart your career after a break? Listed below are a few fundamental steps you need to follow when you want to know how to search for a job after a break. These tips will surely help you plan your return to work, and find a job you might really like.

How to Search for a Job after a Break?

Get the News Out

The initial step on how to search for a job after a break is to get the news out. Let your friends and people in your circles know that you're looking for a job. The more you talk to people, the more chances there are of opportunities coming your way. Moreover, the only way for you to know of what’s new in the job market is by talking to people.

The Morale Booster

It's important to point out a very significant observation here. People always remember you as you were before, you took a break. When you tell your ex-colleagues or your ex-boss that you're looking for work again, they'll remember you to be as competent and skilled at your job as you were before. That's a great motivational factor. So, if you're feeling unsure of how competent and productive you're going to feel, just remember this positive perception that people have of you.

Be Proactive

The first thing you need to do before searching for a job is to reskill yourself. Familiarize yourself with the latest updates in the workforce. You can do this by subscribing to business magazines. You can also follow certain TV shows that discuss the job market and business trends in your country. And again, talk to your friends in the workforce who you trust can guide you correctly.

Be Patient

Before preparing to apply for jobs and giving interviews, take time to plan what you are going to do. Note down your preferences, your strengths, the kind of work environment you expect, and other related things that are important for you. If you plan to get a job you want to enjoy working at, you really need to think about all these factors thoroughly before beginning your job hunting.

Be Open to the Possibility of Doing Something Different

Now that you are going to start afresh, you may want to consider doing something you did not get a chance to do before. Utilize the time in your career break to think about trying a completely new career, and developing the skills for that. You may have been doing a job that you were academically qualified for. In your second innings now, you should try to take up your hobby, your passion as a career choice if you like. Make use of all your resources to see if it turns into something substantial. You can intern for a short period to gain experience, or you can volunteer. Try out all possibilities and give your alternative choice a chance to become your primary one. This way, you'll really love working, and the gap of your career break won't affect you as much.

 

Charge Right

Never compromise on what you feel you should be paid for. Before your interview, do some market research on what is the current pay package for the job role you are interviewing for. On a broader perspective, do a detailed market research on the salary trends of the job roles you wish to apply for, or expect to get offered. If you have a good, stable starting point, you can build on that over time with your experience and expertise.

Don’t Be Discouraged

It could happen that when you decide to get back into the workforce, you face many challenges. For example, imagine yourself regularly being online every day, researching companies, applying for jobs. But, there are no results. You may try talking to people around you about you returning to work but find no good leads. Don't be discouraged, though. Believe in yourself and your abilities. Believe that a career break cannot take away the skills that you had developed over the years while you were working.

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